WiredCampus

What do Adults Need to Learn?

Everyone talks about how to protect children online. But few address the risks adults face online and using digital technologies and devices. Yet, we bank and spend money online, book travel and make reservations. We invest, communicate with our healthcare providers and insurance companies. We have one Facebook page, but share it with our bosses and employees, neighbors, our kids and our parents, distance family members and community organizations. We share our political affiliations, complaints and vocal opinions, and advocate for causes. Our childhood friends share our childhood secrets and when we go through a divorce, our dirty laundry gets posted online. We turn to cyberdating sites and networks to find love and plan our weddings and anniversaries online. We romance each other with intimate pictures and hot webcam sessions when we are apart, and text each other when close enough to touch. Here we provide training in online issues specifically geared towards adults and their needs.

We at WiredSafety believe that adults need to learn in a way that suits them at a time that suits them. So we've greated a mixture of stand alone learning units on key areas as well as multimedia presentations you can listen to and live events to choose from. Choose the format that best suits you.

E-Learning Units

These short self-paced e-learning units give you the information and help you need for issues you face today:

Tutorials

These multimedia tutorials introduce complex issues in a simple way for adults to understand. We also have PDF options in some cases, to allow you to printout the tutorial and take it with you.

Got a Minute for Parry?

In a countdown to one minute, Parry Aftab delivers a skill or pointer for adults on how they can use digital technologies in safer and more effective ways. As she always points out, "We adults need to stick together. It's the only way we can figure this out as well as an 8-year-old does." All joking aside, Parry takes complicated issues and makes them look easy.

How Do We Teach Our Kids and Tweens?

Tweenangels

You have probably heard about our Teenangels or seen them in action. Tweenangels are their younger counterparts. Tweenangels has been formed for those between seven and twelve years of age. Most chapters are formed in schools as part of the curriculum. Others are after school activities or clubs, but there are also chapters formed by community groups, parents, and home schoolers.

Once personally trained by Parry Aftab, the training has now moved online. Parry delivers her message through video and multimedia presentations. Flash animation, forums, and interactivity provide the resources that are used by adult mentors to guide the teens through their training. You can find out more about them and how you can get a chapter started in your area, by visiting Tweenangels.org.

Even Teens Have Things to Learn!

Teenangels are a group of thirteen to eighteen year old volunteers that have been specially trained in all aspects of online safety, privacy and security. After completion of the required training, the Teenangels run unique programs in schools to spread the word about responsible and safe surfing to other teens and younger kids, parents, and teachers. They have four roles: as ambassadors for WiredSafety to the media and the public; presenting the youth perspective to industry leaders; to conduct research to spot trends and influences faced by young people; and as peer-advisors to other young people in hosting events, doing workshops and presentations and running summits.

They help span the generation gap through their activities and presentations to youth and adult groups, in schools and around the community. They write columns for Web sites and become expert public speakers and researchers. They work with companies like Disney, Microsoft, MTV, Facebook and AOL and are trained by law enforcement agencies and leading experts. They have testified in front of Congress and appeared on TV and the media numerous times and briefed the UK Parliament. Teenangels is especially relevant since the two biggest influences in a teen's life are parents and peers. In the formative years, parents are the center of their learning, the further they travel from the cradle, the greater the influence of their peers. Anyone who has a teenager will tell you about the battle between parental and peer influence. (And all we have to do is remember back to when we were teens to know who wins!)

With the advent of the Internet, a generation of digital natives was born. Raised with the technology, they quickly left their parents behind in a cloud of cyberdust. Teens suddenly found themselves in an online world devoid of adult guidance. They were able to play, work, and socialize. They were also able to do anything that popped into their teen brains and get in trouble in a world apart from parents. Parents couldn't even warn them of risks. Parents had no idea how things worked well enough to understand or spot the real risks. That's where Teenangels come in. Before Teenangels, their only role models were their peers, and that model wasn't always pretty. With little adult guidance and the perceived anonymity of the Internet, online problems soon resulted. Teens acted out and were vulnerable to the predators, scammers and other unscrupulous adults. And it all made the headlines, worldwide. In the mid to late 90's, the papers were plastered with stories about pornography online, after that predators moved to the media forefront, and today it is cyberbullying and sexting that dominates the media landscape. Fear guided parents as they understood what would happen when millions of unsupervised teens could communicate and create from devices they carried in their backpacks, pockets and purses. As usual, teens believed that those fears were overblown and parents were over-reacting. Both were right.

Getting parents and educators up to speed with online life was important, but difficult. Just as critical was providing good role models for teens to follow in their online live. So in 1999, Parry Aftab established the first chapter of the Teenangels. Each year, they put on the WiredKids Summit , on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C. There they present research that they do as part of their training. The teens are on stage and the audience is a powerful and influential group of policy makers, industry leaders, media, educators, and parents. Recognizing that the teens are the experts in their own right, the Teenangels are equal partners with other volunteers in WiredSafety. They work hand in h and to help protect others online and have been instrumental in the evolution of the organization.

Once personally trained by Parry Aftab, the training has now moved online. Parry delivers her message through video and multimedia presentations. Flash animation, forums, and interactivity provide the resources that are used by adult mentors to guide the teens through their training. You can find out more about them, or to book them for your event and how you can get a chapter started in your area, by visiting Teenangels.org

Train-the-Trainers - for WiredSafety Volunteers

People from all over the world of all ages come to us with a wide range of problems and challenges they face online. Luckily, our volunteers come to us from all over the world too, just to help others. But who trains the trainers? Who helps the helpers? WiredSafety does! We value our volunteers and spend a great deal of time on their training and education. Here you will find details of a number of the training programmes we offer. Our training is based on blended learning, a mixture of online classes delivered through a learning management system called Moodle, live classes using Adobe Presenter and where appropriate, one-to-one coaching for the more specialized teams.

Although we are all volunteers many of us in WiredCampus are learning professionals dedicated to giving you the best learning experience we can. All training takes place initially within our learning management system found at http://wiredsafetylearning.org/moodle/ . You then progress to our large online community of volunteers where you can learn with each other, from each other and for each other. Below are some of the learning programmes we deliver.

WiredBuddies - initial training

This is where it all starts. As a new volunteer you will be taken on a journey through WiredSafety so you can get to know the organization and the people in it. Usually this will be as part of a cohort group and you will be assigned a WiredBuddy who will take you through this initial training which takes 6 weeks. our expectation is that you will dedicate 2 hours per week to this training which we hope you will find both informative and fun.

Shortly after being sent your initial welcome letter, all volunteers in training are contacted by a WiredBuddies Division Director by email. We welcome you to the Wiredbuddies program, and then assign you a Wiredbuddy. Wiredbuddies work with new volunteers, on a one-on-one bases. Wired buddies are that friendly smiling personality ready to help and assist our newest volunteers guiding each volunteer through the 6 week ( average length) Wiredsafety Orientation, that will prepare you to understand the basics of online safety, what WiredSafety is about, and familiarize you with the different opportunities to serve in WiredSafety.

Basic Volunteer Classes

Once you have passed your basic training you will be able to take a range of online classes in basic safety. You are encouraged to attend as many of these as you can so you can be up-to-date and ready to help people no matter what division you eventually work in.

These basic classes include:

Anatomy of a predator, Computer Viruses and Myths, Ergonomics, Technology, Identify Theft, Internet Scams and Hoaxes, Intro to Cyberstalking, Profile of a victim, The Internet a window and door, The person on the other side, Privacy and Privacy, Cyberbullying and Harassment etc.

Moderator Classes

Our moderators are the best on the web. This training is a mixture of theory and practice taking you from the consideration of areas such as dealing with people, emotional well being, child sexual predators, cyberstalking and other areas to one to one coaching from an experienced moderator in live situations.

WiredCampus Online Education Staff

For those who want to join our education team we introduce you to the latest techniques in writing for and delivering online education whether live, through learning management systems or using e-learning units. We also cover facilitation and moderation of online communities looking at the best from theory and practice.

Internet Response Team

Cyberbullying, harassment, stalking, viruses, Trojans, identity theft, scams and spam are the domain of WiredSafety's Internet Response Team (IRT). IRT's focus is to provide one-to-one help for individuals of all ages who are having problems with sexual exploitation, cyberbullying, stalking, harassment, identity theft, computer breaches, and related issues. IRT members are some of our most highly trained volunteer. They must progress through a series of online training courses and one-to-one mentoring that equip them with a skill set necessary to accomplish their mission.

The sensitive nature of their work and the pressures involved in helping people with serious online issues, require significant training and a personality that can handle stress, while providing the support and assistance needed to help the victims of online crime or abuse. The sensitive nature of their work and the pressures involved in helping people with serious online issues, require significant training and a personality that can handle stress, while providing the support and assistance needed to help the victims of online crime or abuse. Because of the importance and sensitivity of their role, each trainee is assigned an online mentor who will stay with them through all three phases.

In the first phase, the trainee is introduced to the IRT its objectives, code of ethics, policies, and procedures. They are made aware of the unique nature and sensitive information they well be processing and taught how to deal with these stresses and maintain a healthy mental attitude. By the end of this phase, the trainee has an understanding of the importance of their role and the dedication, and mental attitude that are required to perform it. If they elect to continue the training, their mentor will guide them and evaluate their progress through the next two stages that involve intensive reviews of past cases and simulations that put them through the experience of helping people one-to-one online .

If they complete their training successfully, they are accepted as members of the IRT and begin working with victims under the watchful eye of their mentor and other experienced team members. If you are interested in becoming a part of the IRT or any other WiredSafety division, you can sign up to become a volunteer and begin your training today.